What is Bacillus Coagulans and 7 Things You Must Know About

Probiotics are beneficial live microorganisms contained as a part of foods and dietary supplements. These foods and dietary supplements usually include specific probiotic species. One probiotic species that is considered the probiotic of choice is Bacillus coagulans. B. coagulans are spore-forming, lactic acid producers, thus earning it the classification of Lactobacillus Sporogenes. In this article, we will discuss this probiotic strain, its features, health benefits, and what you must know about them.

Bacillus Coagulans

Seven Things You Must Know About Bacillus Coagulans

When you’ve stumbled upon a probiotic supplement carrying a B. coagulans ingredient, you may wonder what it means. B.coagulans is a Gram-positive, non-pathogenic (friendly) microorganism that exhibits a rod-shaped form. It can form endospores and sturdy outer shells when conditions get hostile. When set in proper conditions, the endospores develop into vegetative cells that can quickly reproduce within a few hours. B. coagulans entails a sustaining complex environment in which it gleans its energy by fermentation or carbohydrate-catabolism. If B. coagulans is consumed, it can withstand harsh stomach acids; it’s acid-tolerant and motile, where it has a roving, propeller-like nature. It can also thrive in high- and low-impact environments (where there’s high- or low-oxygen).

B.coagulans is a Gram-positive, non-pathogenic (friendly) microorganism that exhibits a rod-shaped form. It can form endospores and sturdy outer shells when conditions get hostile. When set in proper conditions, the endospores develop into vegetative cells that can quickly reproduce within a few hours. B. coagulans entails a sustaining complex environment in which it gleans its energy by fermentation or carbohydrate-catabolism. If B. coagulans is consumed, it can withstand harsh stomach acids; it’s acid-tolerant and motile, where it has a roving, propeller-like nature. It can also thrive in high- and low-impact environments (where there’s high- or low-oxygen).

Here are seven important things you may need to know about B. coagulans:

  1. It’s resistant to heat and acid because of its spore-forming feature. It can survive various manufacturing, shipping, and storage processes with no damage of viable count. It’s also shelf-stable at room temperature.
  2. coagulans was first registered at an Iowa-based canned evaporated milk facility where it had coagulated milk. Bacillus coagulans Hammer was the bacteria strain encountered and became the name type of strain for the species.
  3. Not all B. coagulans strains are probiotics. The USFDA proclaims that a couple of B. coagulans strains are GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe).
  4. Both humans and animals regularly ingest bacillus bacteria spores unintentionally through foods and in some fermented products. These strains are present in products such as cereals, baked goods, dairy and milk products, confectionery, puddings, fats and oils, grains, soups, non-alcoholic beverages, coffee, and tea.
  5. coagulans is a soil-based organism. It’s widely present in water and soil, which are both harsh environments. Bacillus bacteria have the knack to defend themselves from varied temperature, acidity, and salinity by enclosing protective spores around themselves. When the environment is favorable, they will release themselves from their spores to thrive and multiply. This characteristic often comes in handy in a probiotic dietary supplement.
  6. Animal studies reveal that B. coagulans don’t inhabit intestines permanently. Additionally, a human study grants no evidence of the bacteria present in the fecal matter after six days of ingestion.
  7. In 1939, the taxonomical classification in the Bergey’s Manual of Determinative Bacteriology seventh edition was changed to B. coagulans. However, some experts still continue to use the original name. It shares a handful of positive characteristics contained in a Lactobacillus bacteria that’s why it’s first believed to be a component of the Lactobacillus family. Through DNA coding, B. coagulans was reclassified as part of the Bacillus family.

Bacillus Coagulans Benefits

Discovering the right Bacillus coagulans species used as a probiotic is one of the major probiotic industry breakthroughs. Studies show that B. coagulans offer multiple benefits. However, this species have strain-specific probiotic benefits. Products that contain B. coagulans strains include Lactospore by Sabinsa (SBC37-01) and Natural Goal’s Probiotic Ultra Blend (Unique IS2).

Benefits of B. coagulans include the following:

  • Prevents diarrhea (viral and traveler’s diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea)
  • Promotes good digestion
  • Treats irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Relieves inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • Treats Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis
  • Suppresses bacterial overgrowth
  • Heals infections (respiratory, urinary tract, and vaginal)
  • Prevents cancer risks
  • Strengthens immune system
  • Normalizes intestinal flora
  • Rehabilitates hypertension

Some experts do question the safety of B. coagulans. Here are some of the reasons why:

  • If taken in large doses, B. coagulans may flood the intestines, thus leading to an unnatural intestinal state since they aren’t resident bacteria inside the human body.
  • There’s a possibility of B. coagulans to revert to their endospore state while remaining in the body since they are spore-forming species.
  • There’s a chance of B. coagulans spores to move out of the intestines into the blood or other major organs, which may cause possible ailments.
  • B. coagulans includes strains in products where it generates toxins that can cause diarrhea or any potential harm or illness. It’s best to check and verify a product’s ingredients before purchasing.

So the next time you search for a probiotic dietary supplement, read up on the labels. If you’ve come across a product that claims to have Bacillus coagulans in it, be sure to verify the probiotic strain. B. coagulans proves to stimulate immune system function and reduce pathogens (harmful bacteria). However, there’s no sufficient information to know if B. coagulans works for medicinal purposes.

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